communication

How to Improve Your Safety Communication Program

A safety communication program is the sum of all activities related to promoting and maintaining interest in workplace safety among all employees. There are many policies, processes, and programs that make up a company’s overall safety program. One vital program in any safety program is the safety communication program. This post dives into some things to consider before implementing such a program or even when trying to improve an existing one.

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Do You Know Your Lumens?

When working with halogen and strobe lights, manufacturers traditionally use watts to relay the “brightness” of the light output.  A watt is a measurement of power, so when more efficient and brighter LEDs were introduced that produced less power, watts no longer conveyed the same meaning.  Lumens started to gain more traction in the market.  A lumen measures the actual light emitted from the source over a period of time.

DistratctedDriving

Distracted Driving: Tips to Keep You Safe

The National Safety Council recognizes April as driving awareness month to draw attention to distracted driving.  According to the NSC, thousands of people die every year from distracted driving – whether making phone calls, texting, drowsy driving, or eating a sandwich, distracted driving comes in various forms…but are all equally as fatal. Taking your eyes off the road or hands off the wheel, even for just a couple of seconds, puts yourself and others in a dangerous situation.  

Power of Habit

Learn, Apply, Practice and Create a Habit

Safety habits can be either good or bad.  You may have heard it said before about an individual, “They have poor safety habits,” or “They have good safety habits.” When supervisors, team leads, or co-workers don’t say something to someone who is performing an unsafe act, the action goes unchecked.  The offender, either consciously or unconsciously, considers the action as acceptable behavior and will repeat and habitualize the action.

OOOOOPS I Dropped It!!

In 2016 alone, there were 255 fatalities and over 49,000 reported injuries from small parts, structural components and other items that are transferred and used at heights.  The BLS has labeled falling objects at height as the third leading cause of injuries on the jobsite.  Compared to 2015 deaths from falling objects, we went up over 3% and injuries over 6% leading to the conclusion that its time we take a closer look at this problem.

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