Advanced Head Protection

Advanced Head Protection Explained

Head protection policies for construction are being updated in a move away from traditional hard hats.  Many companies are adopting safety helmets meeting ANSI Type I & EN 12492, as well as ANSI Type II & EN 14052 hard hats, addressing the higher risks and hazards on today’s job sites. Hard Hats in the US must meet the Z89.1-2014 safety standard set by ANSI/ISEA. So what is the difference between ANSI Type I and Type II head protection? The standard establishes the types and classes of hard hat options that provide appropriate protection for hazards in their specific workplaces. Read on to learn about the differences of head protection and the implementation of MIPS® technology.

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ASTM F3445: The New Standard for Slip Resistance — What Does It Mean?

When deciding on footwear, slip resistance is one of the most important factors to consider for wearer safety. While other countries had long ago established slip resistance ratings for footwear, the US did not have an established SR specification. As of July 2021, the US finally introduced ASTM F3445. This new Slip Resistant requirement establishes minimum coefficient of friction requirements to label footwear as slip resistant or “SR”. It also levels the playing field by which all manufacturers are evaluated and to which Safety Managers can refer when specifying or purchasing footwear.

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Sqwincher: Sodium Intake and Long-Term Health Outcomes

Sodium plays an important role in allowing the human body to function properly, but most people are consuming far more than their bodies really need—and this can cause more harm than good. The American Heart Association found that an astounding 90% of Americans consume too much sodium, with an average of 3,400 milligrams each day. Only 15% of this sodium is naturally occurring. More than 70% of it comes from processed and restaurant foods, with an additional 10% added during cooking or eating.

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FAQ’s for Emergency Bleed Control Situations

Serious injury can lead to life-threatening blood loss within minutes.  Being prepared to provide lifesaving care when the unexpected happens requires more than a first aid kit.  Here are some frequently asked questions about emergency bleed control situations that may help save a life. Remember the ABC’s of bleeding control when you arrive on the scene:
A. Alert Call 9-1-1 or tell someone to call 9-1-1.
B. Bleeding Find the bleeding injury
C. Compress Apply pressure to stop the bleeding

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